Welcome to GyroWiki!

Resources for players and developers to enjoy great gyro controls in any game on Windows that uses a mouse.


GyroWiki is all about getting great gyro controls into games. Players will learn how to add gyro controls to games that don't support them using JoyShockMapper. Developers will learn how to treat the gyro as a mouse, and how to take advantage of that to change how we play console games.

Get Started with JoyShockMapper

JoyShockMapper is an open source tool for playing games on Windows with your DualShock 4, JoyCons, or Pro Controller by converting their inputs into keyboard and mouse inputs. It's what I use to play games the way you see in the video above with precise, responsive, reliable gyro controls.

Check out the getting started guide and learn how to use it along with the growing collection of community resources on this site.

Find Configs in the Games Database

Save yourself the trouble of calibrating JoyShockMapper by getting all the info you need for your favourite game in the database. Games like:

But there are a bunch more! Check out the full list here. Or, if your favourite isn't there, join the site (it's free) and share your configurations for other players looking to enjoy gyro controls.

Add Really Good Gyro Controls to Your Game

Developers, Sony and Nintendo's current-gen controllers have gyros in them that are precise and responsiveness enough to be used as a mouse. This is especially true of the DualShock 4, and it's remarkable that this feature has been almost completely ignored as a pointing device for so long.

Some games, like Splatoon, Zelda, and Fortnite (the Switch version only, weirdly), have embraced gyro controls, but leave the player with the impression that gyro controls are somehow inherently sloppy, imprecise, and thus awkward to learn. But these are problems not with gyro controls, but their implementation in those games.

Building on the innovations of games like these along with my experience making JoyShockMapper, I present a three-part guide to adding excellent gyro controls to your game, from a simple patch to a game-defining integration:

  1. The Gyro is a Mouse - Any game that is better on PC because of the mouse can be made better for consoles with good gyro controls. This includes already popular genres (shooters and action-adventures) as well as games that really cannot function without a mouse (most real-time strategy games, dota-likes). My aim is to establish really good conventions for simple, transferable, responsive gyro controls.
  2. The Flick Stick - For 3D games, we can layer gyro aiming on top of traditional thumbstick aiming for those who are used to it, but what if we could do something else that could put the controller on much better footing against mouse players?
  3. Unlocking the Aimer (Coming Soon) - For 3D games. With one precise input for aiming (gyro) and one imprecise input for the camera (thumbstick), why lock the aimer to the centre of the screen? What problems with traditional mouse aiming does this overcome?

My goal is for game developers and players to embrace gyro controls. Done right, they are easier for new players to learn, have more room for skilled players to master, and elevate the controller to (at least almost) the level of a mouse without losing its advantages of comfort and mobility.

Like many advances in gaming technology across a variety of disciplines, these better practices seem obvious once you're familiar with them. I hope they will serve as a springboard for future innovations that'll also seem so simple in retrospect. Good ideas are only proven in their implementation, so a tool like JoyShockMapper is invaluable for testing out these ideas in your favourite games or games you've made.


Check back here or follow me on Twitter @JibbSmart if you want to stay on-top of what's changing on GyroWiki. Join the Gyro Gaming Discord for all things gyro gaming related - whether it's with the tools shown here, the Steam Controller, or something else. Reach out to me with any questions or to share from your experiences (positive or negative) with gyro controls.

If you'd rather watch videos than read articles, or you're looking for something easier to share, I've got a growing channel showing JoyShockMapper in action while explaining best practices: